Photo Credit to Denis Ryan Kelly Jr.; Carmen in Carmen

Photo Credit to Denis Ryan Kelly Jr.; Carmen in Carmen

"Batton's voice is a powerhouse of dark, burnished bronze, seamless throughout its range, a steady flow of gorgeous sound."  (Charles H. Parsons; Opera News)

" ElizabethBatton, an American mezzo with a gorgeous voice and a wonderfully natural stage personality. In her hands, the maid Zuzka became a three-dimensional character. Batton is surely destined for greater things."  (Andrew Clark; Financial Times)

Winner of Best Performance by a Supporting Female Singer:
"All women sang well and evenly and gave standing performances. However, there can only be one and the One we select is Elizabeth Batton for her consistently good performance in "Midsummer Night's Dream". Batton, was sulky, moody, petulant, seductive and she could belt out a tune"  (Opera Online)


"In her Indianapolis Opera debut, mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton turns in a searing portrayal of Charlotte, who favors duty over passion, then belatedly realizes she is missing out on the love of her life. One of Batton's greatest moments comes during her Act 3 letter aria, which works its way from mournful lyricism to a piercing climax."  (Whitney Smith; Indianapolis Star)

"Elizabeth Batton's touching Suzuki was sung in a dark, potently expressive voice."  (Opera News; Tim Smith)

"And Butterfly's maid, Suzuki, was sung with real gravitas and passion by mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton."  (The Washington Post, Philip Kennicott)

"The Slovak mezzo Denisa Hamarová was suitably dominating as Mánek’s mother, whilst the American mezzo Elizabeth Batton gave a warmly sympathetic performance as Eva’s companion Zuzka."  (Richard Beith; Dvorak Society Newsletter)

 

Werther (Charlotte); Indianapolis Opera

"The role of Charlotte, the unconsummated love of Werther's life, was even more impressively sung by the very attractive Elizabeth Batton. She made her IO debut as Charlotte, who, coerced into marrying Albert on the deathbed wish of her mother, in reality loves none other than Werther. Batton's singing was clear, heavily modulated and well-projected."  (Tom Aldrigde; Nuvo News)

"In her Indianapolis Opera debut, mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton turns in a searing portrayal of Charlotte, who favors duty over passion, then belatedly realizes she is missing out on the love of her life. One of Batton's greatest moments comes during her Act 3 letter aria, which works its way from mournful lyricism to a piercing climax."  (Whitney Smith; Indianapolis Star)

 Photo by Denis Ryan Kelly Jr.

 Photo by Denis Ryan Kelly Jr.

Jane Eyre, Mrs. Rochester, Opera Theatre of St. Louis

Photo by Ken Howard

Photo by Ken Howard

 

A Midsummer Night's Dream (Hermia); Pittsburgh Opera

"Elizabeth Batton's Hermia had depth of tone and a fine enamel finish."  (Scott Cantrell; Opera News Online)

"Gifted with a splendidly full mezzo, Elizabeth Batton could have graced any international stage with her trenchantly amusing Hermia."  (David Shengold; Opera News Online)

Winner of Best Performance by a Supporting Female Singer, 2004:

"All women sang well and evenly and gave standing performances. However, there can only be one and the One we select is Elizabeth Batton for her consistently good performance in "Midsummer Night's Dream". Batton, was sulky, moody, petulant, seductive and she could belt out a tune"  (Opera Online - Summer, 2004)

"Both soprano Elizabeth Batton, who sang the role of Hermia, and Inna Dukach who sang the role of Helena, gave stand out vocal performances as rivals whose paths and fortunes crossed when Puck sprinkled a little too much powder around. Their stage rivalry, including stripping down to short, sexy silk nighties, was done with humor and expressiveness, and was pleasing to the eye as well. Each of these women was self-confident, strong in their roles and convincing as actors."  (Paul Jospeh Waslkowski; OperaOnline)

With Inna Dukatch  

With Inna Dukatch  

"Todd Wilander, Sari Gruber, Elizabeth Batton and Troy Cook are at the top of their game. They're svelte and good-looking, too."  (Paul Horsley; The Kansas City Star)

"The large supporting cast was a continual source of riches: ...Elizabeth Batton as a sparkling Hermia"  (Paul Horsley; The Kansas City Star)

"Elizabeth Batton's near-contralto tones gave sensuality to Hermia."  (Robert Croan; Opera News Online)

"The four lovers were all fine young singers. Eric Cutler as Lysander, Elizabeth Batton as Hermia, Paul Whelan as Demetrius and Madeline Bender as Helena were well matched in vocal quality and strength, and adept at the physical demands director Curran made."  (Mark Kanny; Pittsburgh Tribune)

"The quartet of lovers was as rich in voice as it was in humor.  Elizabeth Batton's Hermia was fiesty and fun, with her rich and effectively used mezzo-soprano."   (Jim Lowe; Times Argus Staff)


Les Contes d'Hoffmann (Nicklausse/ Muse) Los Angeles Opera/ Orlando Opera

"Mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton sang an impassioned Nicklausse/Muse."  (Truman C. Wang; Classical Voice Review)

"Elizabeth Batton is tremendous as the Muse and Nicklausse. She's always there for Hoffmann, cares for him, and picks him up every time he gets knocked down."  (Paul Bernenson; Web Classics Plus)

"As the muse who transforms herself into Hoffmann's friend Nicklausse, Elizabeth Batton acquitted herself admirably.  Her arias drew the audiences in with a variety of emotions and her humorous moments were equally well-received."  (Rick Mortensen; LA Daily News)

"Elizabeth Baton gives a consistently strong performance as Hoffmann's loyal muse, Nicklausse, sick at heart that she cannot save the poet from himself."  (Jim Farber; Daily Breeze)

"The Muse (a pleasing Elizabeth Batton) seems to be suggesting that misfortune rather than love requited makes for artistic inspiration."  (Bondo Wyszpolski; Easy Week)

"Elizabeth Batton sang the trouser role of Nicklausse with aplomb and played the good-natured side-kick with the utmost naturalness."  (Donna Perlmutter; The Hollywood Reporter)

"Elizabeth Batton showed herself to be an eminently intelligent and fluent singer as Nicklausse and the Muse."  (Timothy Mangan; Orange County Register)

"Elizabeth Batton puts trousers on the muse to be Nicklausse, a buddy figure, but sings in every act with remarkable clarity and consistency."  (Laura Hitchcock; Curtain Up)

"Mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton brought a light but vibrant voice to the dual part of the Muse and Nicklausse, and she made Nicklausse's humor complement the Muse's dignity."  (Steven Brown; Orlando Sentinel)

"As the muse/Nicklausse, Batton sang with a clear, athletic voice, rendering emotions from disgust to sympathy."  (Sherli Leonard; Special to the Press Enterprise)

 

Gloriana (Lady Essex); Central City Opera

"Also notable were Cynthia Clayton as Essex's destructively outspoken sister and mezzo Elizabeth Batton as his wife, whose final bow to the queen after the death warrant has been signed (a bow not in the opera's stage-directions) combined with loyalty to a queen and accusation toward a vengeful woman.  It was a moment in an altogether strong show."  (Leighton Kerner; Opera News)

"Elizabeth Batton give a sense of dignity to Lady Essex, and her thrilling, dark, mezzo-soprano voice is a production highlight."   (Mark Arnest; The Gazette)

"Elizabeth Batton excels as Essex's long-suffering wife, Lady Essex."  (Brad Weismann; Colorado Daily)

"Supporting roles are also sung and played with perfection.  Elizabeth Batton and Cynthia Clayton are full in command of Lady Essex and Lady Rich."  (Wes Blomster; The Daily Camera)

"Grant Youngblood , Cynthia Clayton and Elizabeth Baton make a fine trio of power-hungry subjects and vacillating revolutionaries; when joined by Wilson, the group's scheming to seize the throne rings true while providing plenty of intrigue."  (WestWord; Aug. 28th, 2001)

Photo by Richard Feldman

Photo by Richard Feldman

 

Eugene Onegin (Olga); Boston Lyric Opera/ Opera North / Opera Pacific

Elizabeth Batton delivered (an) impressive performance that matched the dreamy mood of this atmospheric tale.  (Paul Joseph Walkowski; OperaOnline.US)

"Elizabeth Batton looked and sounded radiant as innocent young country girl".  (T.J. Medrek; Boston Herald)

"Elizabeth Batton employs a rich, buttery mezzo for her paean to a carefree girlhood" (Sandy MacDonald; The Edge)

"Elizabeth Batton was a convincing, rich-voiced Olga, and the rest of the cast was highly capable."  (Ed Tapper; Bay Windows, Boston)

"Mezzo Elizabeth Batton made a charming minx out of the heroine's sister Olga"  (Richard Dyer; The Boston Globe)

"Elizabeth Batton's vibrant mezzo and volatile personality worked well for Olga."  (William Fregosi; Opera Today)

"Rich-voiced mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton was quite effective as the fickle Olga, successfully vacillating between the faithful fiancéée and intrigued flirt."  (Jim Lowe; The Times Argus)

" Elizabeth Batton sings the shallow Olga with a blush in her voice."  (Timothy Mangan; Orange County Sentinel)

"As Tatiana's flighty, light-headed sister Olga, mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton gave highly spirited singing with a sensuous touch (I, for one, would love to hear her Carmen)."  (Truman C Wang; Classical Voice)

"Mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton was vocally solid and appropriately frivolous."  (Donald Westwood; Opera News Online)

"Elizabeth Batton made an appealing Olga"  (Donald Rosenberg; Plain Dealer)

"As Tatyana’s sister, Elizabeth Batton injects some seductive low tones to their duets, and Marion Pratnicki is comfily commodious as their nanny."  (James Damico; Free Times Cleveland)

"Elizabeth Batton was a convincing, rich-voiced Olga, and the rest of the cast was highly capable."  (Ed Tapper; Bay Windows, Boston)

“The warm chest tones of Elizabeth Batton gave her Olga earthiness, pluck and charm.”  (Wayman Chin, Opera News)

"mezzo Elizabeth Batton looked and sounded radiant as innocent young country girls. (Opera Today)

"Elizabeth Batton (has a) vibrant mezzo and volatile personality. "  (William Fregosi; Boston Herald)

 

Le Nozze di Figaro (Cherubino); Orlando Opera

" Elizabeth Batton played the gender-bending role of the randy young Cherubino with great panache."  (Laura Stewart; The Daytona Beach News Journal)

"Playing the page Cherubino was Elizabeth Batton.  Her singing was superb and her warm, smarmy low notes and a delicious middle register lead her to brilliance in "Voi che sapete" in Act II."  (John Sayers; Ft. Pierce Tribune)

 

Bruckner Mass in F Minor (Mezzo Soloist); American Symphony Orchestra

"Elizabeth Batton (has an) alluring and comforting warmth"  (Paul Griffiths; New York Times)

 

Dido and Aeneas (Dido); New York Chamber Opera

"A gracious Dido, mezzo-soprano Elizabeth Batton sang the part with strong composure in voice and character. Her powerful singing and proud presence gave life to the staunch female leader."  (Celeste Sutherland; The Arts Cure)

 

Metropolitan Opera National Counsel Awards; Metropolitan Opera

"Elizabeth Batton sang with full rich sound and sensibility."  (Antohony Tomassini; New York Times)

 

Antony and Cleopatra (Iras); Carnagie Hall; American Composers Orchestra

"Elizabeth Batton brought humor and pathos to Iras."  (Leighton Kerner; Opera News Online)

 

Photo by Karen Almond

Photo by Karen Almond

Ariadne auf Naxos (Dryade); The Dallas Opera

"Other standouts include Keith Phares as Harlequin and Elizabeth Batton as a sonorous Dryad."  (Scott Cantrell; The Dallas Morning News)

 

The Eternal Road (Ruth); American Symphony Orchestra

"Ruth (was) meltingly sung and acted by Elizabeth Batton."  (Leighton Kerner; The Village Voice)

"Elizabeth Batton was a lyrical Ruth, possessing a rich coloratura able to project over the orchestra despite often singing from their midst." (Frederick L. Kirshnit; Le Concertographe)

"Elizabeth Batton (was) a heart-melting Ruth." (William Weaver; Financial Times)

"Elizabeth Batton as Ruth was affecting and strong."  (Anthony Tomassini; New York Times)